The Prospective and Limitations of the Syrian Constitutional Committee
The Prospective and Limitations of the Syrian Constitutional Committee
The Prospective and Limitations of the Syrian Constitutional Committee
By Sinan Hatahet, Ph.D., Al Sharq Fo

Part of the Syria Transition Challenges Project

The Syrian Constitutional Committee, a UN-authorised constituent assembly, was established to reconcile the Syrian government and the Syrian opposition, in the context of the peace process, by adopting a new constitution for Syria. While it enjoys a measure of international legitimacy, it may be a mechanism to override the terms of UN Security Council’s resolutions 22541 in favour of establishing the Astana talks as the only regulator of the political process. The committee has encountered several challenges. First is the divergence of expectations between the opposition and the Syrian government; second, the lack of a clear time frame for its deliberations; third, the Syrian government’s insistence on imposing its anti-terrorism vision; finally, the lack of international commitment to its outcome, mainly from the US and its partners. This brief examines the positions of both the Syrian government and the opposition and their expectations from the constitutional process as well as the impact of the Turkish offensive in the north east of the country on the process.


 

The ideas expressed are of the author’s not the publisher.

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Dr. Sinan Hatahet is a senior fellow researcher at Sharq Forum and Omran for Strategic Studies. He is also a researcher in the War and Post-Conflict Syria Project of the European University Institute studying Syria's national and local political economy dynamics. Sinan's research interests include non-state actors, the Kurdish political movement, and emerging new regional order. Hatahet holds a Ph.D. in cyber security from the University of Technology of Compiegne, France