Commitment to Control Weaponised Artificial Intelligence: A Step Forward for the OSCE and European Security

Strategic Security Analysis issue 22

Commitment to Control Weaponised Artificial Intelligence: A Step Forward for the OSCE and European Security

By Anna Nadibaidze, PhD fellow at the University of Southern Denmark’s Centre for War Studies

Key points

  • The global debate on weaponised artificial intelligence (AI) often focuses on futuristic “killer robots”, which risks overlooking the fact that these technologies are already part of the security landscape.
  • Diminishing human control over the use of force and the differences in states’ discourse pose a considerable risk for European security and stability.
  • The impact of AI is not inevitable, and states should address this issue through political means, such as a political declaration with a commitment to ensuring human control over the use of force.
  • With its inclusive membership, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) can and should become the platform through which its participating States can take a step forward in the global debate on weaponised AI.

 

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Anna Nadibaidze is a PhD fellow at the University of Southern Denmark’s Centre for War Studies. Her doctoral research explores the relationship between the development of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Russian state identity. She is also a researcher for the European Research Council-funded AutoNorms Project, which examines how autonomous weapons systems shape international norms. She holds an MSc in International Relations from the London School of Economics.